Blogging the biotechnology revolution

Systems Biology is changing the way biology is done. Is it a fad or is it effective? This blog tracks current happenings and helps you stay on top of the field. You can find a list of relevant papers at systems biology paper watch Have you heard a talk or read a paper in bioinformatics / systems biology you would like to tell other people about? Email: and get the word out!

Friday, July 28, 2006

Anti-apoptotic function of a microRNA encoded by the HSV-1 latency-associated transcript. Gupta A, Gartner JJ, Sethupathy P, Hatzigeorgiou AG, Fraser NW
Nature 2006 May 31
Ive alyways wondered about how many viruses stay latent within the body and then activate upon certain stimulus (HIV is the prime example). This paper is remarkable in that it finds that a single gene is expressed during latency in neurons, but curously this gene is not translated into protein. They find that this gene is actually a microRNA that represses members of the TGF-beta pathway. So the idea is that by modulating the signaling in this pathway via microRNA the virus remains latent and undetected within the host cell.

As of late miRNAs have really come forward as a mjor factor in many biological processes. Seems that the next era of drugs may be nucleotide targeting that specifically inhibit the activity of specific miRNAs. Maybe something akin to the gene gun which basically shoots a cell with small bullets covered in the nucleotide sequence and its been shown that cells can integrate this sequence.


Anonymous Anonymous said...

Actually, there is very little evidence that HIV has a true latency like herpes. That is where there is a significant change in gene expression of the virus; with no replication until some stimulus (lambda phage is the textbook example). HIV seems to continue replication at a low level (often called "smoldering") at specific sites such as lymph nodes or perhaps even the brain, with replication occurring as the immune system is depleted.

9:43 AM  

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